Connected by Coffee

Published nailah.summers - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 5:00pm

Connected By Coffee is an inspiring and thought-provoking documentary about the lives and history of the people who grow the coffee we drink.

The film follows two North American coffee roasters on a 1,000-mile journey across Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua to listen to the stories of the people who grow their coffee. On the way they meet with soldiers who have become growers, powerful women who are controlling their own destinies and countless small-scale farmers joining together to form cooperatives.
This film serves as a starting point to educate coffee drinkers about the basics of fair trade, cooperatives, social justice, shade grown/organic, the conflict in fair trade, coffee rust – AND invites the viewer to not only make conscious purchasing decisions, but to learn more, get involved, and take action.

When:
Thu, 10/23/2014 - 7:00pm
Cost: 
$3-5 suggested donation

In celebration of the CMC's 21st anniversary, we invite you all to join us on Wednesday, October 22nd at the CMC for a panel featuring organizer Phillip Agnew, the Executive Director of the Dream Defenders and frequent guest of MSNBC's All In with Chris Hayes, and Malcolm London, 21 year-old Chicago poet, activist, and educator whom Cornel West named the Gil­ Scott Heron of
this generation. They will be discussing the unique experience of organizing in the 21st century, in the age of social media, Trayvon Martin, and now Ferguson.

When:
Wed, 10/22/2014 - 7:00pm
Cost: 
Free, donations appreciated

THE LEGACY OF 50 YEARS OF US INVOLVEMENT IN CENTRAL AMERICA

During the 1970's and 1980's there were wars, revolutions, indigenous repression and death squad violence in much of Central America. In this country there was also a strong solidarity movement with the oppressed people in and from that region. Now, except for a recent coup in Honduras, and a humanitarian crisis over immigrant children from from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras entering the US we hear very little about the region. The US was very involved in Central America over the past 50 years, and it is worth a review as to why we have such a immigration crisis, and what is the legacy of all the US meddling. On Tuesday October 14th the CMC will host a program on El Salvador and Guatemala. On the following Tuesday Oct 21 we will look at Honduras and Nicaragua. Each night will be an overview by experts on Latin America of the recent history of the evenings countries and what role the US played in that history, followed by discussion. Each nights programs will begin at 7pm at the Civic Media Center.

When:
Tue, 10/21/2014 - 7:00pm
Cost: 
Free, donations appreciated

Monday Movie: "Apache Chronicle"

Published kenziecooke - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 5:00pm

Young, gifted, native and female...

A film about the life and art and the art of life of five bold women, skateboard and artists connected to Apache Skateboards.

When documentary filmmaker Nanna Dalunde contacted Douglas Miles (San Carlos Apache/Akimel O’odham) of Apache Skateboards, he was skeptical. Dalunde wanted to make a film about the female skateboarders associated with Miles's skate crew -- to investigate why they skate and why they create. The problem? Dalunde is from Sweden. Like many Natives who've seen skewed visions of their people on screen, Miles was wary of yet another non-Native filmmaker (even a well-intentioned one) who might depict American Indians from an outsider’s perspective. He wanted to ensure that the skaters would retain rights to how they were represented, and that they would hold partial rights to the documentary as well.

The solution was both unconventional and simple: Miles stepped up to assist and facilitate the project as a co-director.

The result is Apache Chronicle, a 41-minute look at the lives and artwork of five young Native American female artists and skateboarders. It's a remarkable perspective that we rarely see in documentary film: the young Native female perspective.

Culture, one of them explains, is "something you do." It is a practice that must be exercised every day. But this ability -- in fact, ease -- of expression did not come easily. We see the processes of how they gained voice, how they began to realize the power in being a woman, in being an artist, in being Native American, and in being positive. Indeed, positivity reigns supreme for this group, and they promote a PMA: positive mental attitude.

When:
Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
Cost: 
Free, donations appreciated

CMC 21st Anniversary Homecoming

Published kenziecooke - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 4:28pm

Come celebrate the CMC's homecoming! It's our 21st year functioning as the Civic Media Center and our fifth year in the new Main Street location.  If you haven't been in yet, come check us out for our open house and potluck starting at 5pm!  Bring a dish or drink to share and meet up with new and past volunteers, coordinators, board and community members.  Hope to see you there!

When:
Sat, 10/18/2014 - 5:00pm
Cost: 
Free, donations appreciated
Syndicate content